Precis

For my Research Article, I am working on the topic of book adaptations because I want to find out more about adapting them into a television series over a movie is beneficial in order to help my reader understand better if taking the time to adapt a book into a longer television series over a two hour movie is beneficial to both audiences and creators.

I have choses to use MLA format for this project as it is one of the most widely used formats in todays media-driven world.

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Katz, Brandon. “Why Neil Patrick Harris Is ‘Gobsmacked’ by ‘A Series of Unfortunate Events’.” Observer, Observer, 12 Feb. 2018, observer.com/2018/02/neil-patrick-harris-talks-serious-unfortunate-events-season-2-netflix-budget/.

In the article “Why Neil Patrick Harris Is ‘Gobsmacked’ by ‘A Series of Unfortunate Events’” (2018), Brandon Katz discusses with Neil Patrick Harris, the star of A Series of Unfortunate Events, about the production value of the show and how greatly that improves the quality of it. Katz supports his claims by having Neil Patrick Harris go into detail about the amount of built sets the show relies on rather than CGI. His purpose was to get a deeper insight on how much money was going into the quality of the program in order to claim if it’s worth the production costs based on the experience it is providing. He appears to writing to the audience of a general Netflix or streaming service audience due to his vocabulary, as he assumes the reader has a general knowledge of how Netflix works.

Leadbeater, Alex. “Is Netflix’s A Series of Unfortunate Events Better Than The Movie?” Screen Rant, Screen Rant, 19 Jan. 2017, screenrant.com/series-unfortunate-events-movie-vs-tv/.

In the article “Is Netflix’s A Series of Unfortunate Events Better Than The Movie?” (2017), Alex Leadbeater compares the quality and cost of the television series adaptation and film adaptation of A Series of Unfortunate Events by Lemony Snicket. Leadbeater supports his claim by breaking down different aspects of the show and film and comparing the aspects such as formats and portrayal of characters separately rather than making one major claim of one being superior to the other. His purpose is for us as the audience to come up with our own opinions on the two adaptations so that we can either agree with his or spark a larger argument to perpetuate buss about the story. He has somewhat of a formal tone, as though he was writing this for a grade in an English class and wanted to impress probably his boss but also avid film analyzers

Martin, Emmie. “Here’s How Much It Costs HBO to Produce One Episode of ‘Game of Thrones’.” CNBC, CNBC, 6 Aug. 2017, www.cnbc.com/2017/08/04/it-costs-millions-to-produce-one-episode-of-hbos-game-of-thrones.html.

In the article “Here’s How Much It Costs HBO to Produce One Episode of ‘Game of Thrones’.” (2017), Emmie Martin asserts Game of Thrones getting a 4 million dollar budget boost per episode is absolutely worth the quality of the show in how much of a difference it adds to the marketing of the show’s value. Martin supports her claims by discussing the amount of attention the show gains over every season and is deserving of the boost with all of the ad revenue that it’s conjuring. Her purpose is to generate buzz around the latest season of Game of Thrones so that the viewers are hyped up about the budget boost for more action. Her voice in the article in young, as to be read by avid younger fans of the fantasy series, meeting the 18-49 age demographic of the show.

Shamsian, Jacob. “A Side-by-Side Comparison of the Movie and TV Versions of ‘A Series of Unfortunate Events’ Reveals One Huge Difference.” INSIDER, INSIDER, 25 Jan. 2017, www.thisisinsider.com/a-series-of-unfortunate-events-movie-tv-comparison-2017-1.

In the article “A Side-by-Side Comparison of the Movie and TV Versions of ‘A Series of Unfortunate Events’ Reveals One Huge Difference.”(2017), Jacob Shamsian asserts that the second adaptation of A Series of Unfortunate Events is significantly more racially diverse than the film adaptation from 2004. Shamsian supports his claim by bringing up side by side evidence of roles that were portrayed by white actors in the first film are now played by people of color in the television series. His purpose is to bring awareness to casting racially diverse casts based on talent in order to show that not all characters need to be the same color as who portrayed them first. He appears to write shorter sentences and uses side-by-side comparison imagery to get his point across, which accommodates the present day audience of visual learners.

Tiffany, Kaitlyn. “How Netflix Made A Series of Unfortunate Events, Its First Great TV for Families.” The Verge, The Verge, 13 Jan. 2017, www.theverge.com/2017/1/13/14266208/netflix-a-series-of-unfortunate-events-interview-daniel-handler.

In the article “How Netflix Made A Series of Unfortunate Events, Its First Great TV for Families.” (2017), Kaitlyn Tiffany argues why watching so many episodes of television in a row isn’t annoying, even when they’re about an hour long each. Tiffany supports her claim by discussing how we like to have the option to stop after each episode yet choose not to and keep binge watching. Her purpose is make people more aware of their watching habits so that we as active watchers can curb our habits while still watching what we want to watch. She writes like a millennial and is probably writing for millennial, as we and gen z are the ones that are most commonly choosing to watch eight hours of television over two hours of a movie.

One thought on “Precis”

  1. Good work with the précis. For your research, see what you can find for more scholarly materials. Adaptation is a giant topic in a lot of media studies, so I’m betting you can find more academically robust material to support your ideas (in addition to what is here).

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